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Line 3622, etc. - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

3622 Ham. What call you the carriages?5.2.154
3622+1 {Hora. I knew you must be edified by the margent ere you had} 3622+15.2.156
3622+2 {done.} {N3} 3622+25.2.156
1747 warb
warb
3622+1 margent] Warburton (ed. 1747) : “Horatius seem’d to wonder that Hamlet should be so well versed in this Court-jargon: But he now finds him at a loss about the meaning of the word carriages, and says, pleasantly, I knew you must be edified by the Margent e’er you had done. i.e. I knew you would have need of a comment, at last, to understand the text. In the old books the gloss or comment ws usually printed in the margent of the leaf.”
1755 John
John
3622+1 margent] Johnson (1755, marge, margent, margin, 1,2) : n.s. [margo, Latin; marge, French] 1. The border; the brink; the edge; the verge. ‘He drew his flaming sword,a and struck at him so fiercely, that the upper marge Of his sevenfold shield away it took.’ FQ. ii. ‘Never since Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead, Or on the beached margent of the sea. Shakespeare’ ‘An airy crowd came rushing where he stood, Which fill’d the margin of the fatal flood.’ Dryden’s ŒN.
“2. The edge of a page left blank, or fill’d with a short note. ‘As much love in rhime, As would be cramm’d up in a sheet of paper Writ on both sides the leaf, margent and all.’ Shakespeare ‘Reconcile those two places, which both you and the margins of our bibles acknowledge to be parallel.’ Hammond. ‘He knows in law, nor text, nor margent.’ Swift.”
1773 v1773
v1773 : warb
3622+1 margent] Steevens (ed. 1773) : “ Dr. Warburton very properly observes, that in the old books the gloss or comment was usually printed on the margent of the leaf.”
mSTV1 Mss. notes by STEEVENS in v1773 (Folger Library)
mSTV1: warb (only “The meaning . . . text”)
3622+1 margent] Warburton (ms. notes in Steevens, ed. 1773) : “The meaning is, I knew you w[oul]d have need of a comment, at last, to understand [th]e text. Warburton
1774 capn
capn : warb
3622+1 margent] Capell (1774:1:1:148) : In the latter[third modern editor or WARBURTON] is a good explanation of what Horatio says at l. 8 of the opposite page: “margent” (properly, margin) is put there for—a comment; the margin of the leaf in old books being commonly fill’d with it. “
1778 v1778
v1778 = v1773 + magenta underlined
3622+1 margent] Steevens (ed. 1778) : So, in Decker’s Honest Whore, part 2d, 1630: ‘—I read Strange comments in those margins of your looks.’ This speech is omitted in the folio. STEEVENS
1784 ays1
ays1 ≈ v1778 (only v1773 note)
3622+1 margent]
1785 v1785
v1785 - v1778
3622+1 margent]
1787 ann
ann = v1785
3622+1 margent]
1790 mal
mal = v1785 + magenta underlined
3622+1 margent] Malone (ed. 1790) : “See Vol. X.[Luc.] p. 92, n. 6. MALONE”
[See following note from Rape of Lucrece.]
mal
3622+1 margent] Malone (ed. 1790, 10:92-3) : <p. 92> “writ in the glassy margents of such books;]] So, in [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)]: </p. 92> <p. 93> ‘And what obscur’d in this fair volume lies, Find written in the margin of his eyes.’ Again, in [Ham. a.s.? (3622+1)]: ‘I knew you must be edified by the margent, ere you had done.’ Malone.” </p. 93>
This is n. 6 on page 92-3 of Luc.
1791- rann
rann: standard
3622+1 margent] Rann (ed. 1791-): “make use of the side notes, a comment, explain one phrase by the help of another.”
1793 v1793
v1793 = v1785 + magenta underlined
3622+1 margent] Steevens (ed. 1793) : “Again, in The Contention betwyxte Churchyeard and Camell , &c. 1560: ‘A solempne processe at a blussshe He quoted here and there, With matter in the margent set’ &c.”
1803 v1803
v1803= v1793
3622+1 margent]
1813 v1813
v1813 = v1803
3622+1 margent]
1819 cald1
cald1 : v1813 (Decker // only) + magenta underlined
3622+1 margent] Caldecott (ed. 1819) : “The margins of books in our author’s day were stuffed with comments and references. Drayton in his Polyolbion says, ‘If he have other authority for it, I would his margine had bin but so kinde, as to have imparted it.’ Fo. 1622,p. 277.
“Steevens cites Decker’s Honest Whore: “—I read Strange comments in those margins of your looks.” Part II. 1630.”
1821 v1821
v1821 = v1813
3622+1 margent]
1822 Nares
Nares : John
3622+1 margent] Nares (1822; 1906): “Marge, and Margent]] Both these are rather antiquated forms of the word margin. They have been longest preserved in poetry. Dr. Johnson has given sufficient instances of their use.”
1826 sing1
sing1: standard
3622+1 margent] Singer (ed. 1826) : “The gloss or commentary in old books was ususally on the margin of the leaf. This speech is not in the folio.”
1832 cald2
cald2 = cald1 + Rom. analogue
3622+1 margent] Caldecott (ed. 1832) : “and so ‘written in the margin of his eyes.’ [Rom. 1.3.? (0000)] Lady Cap”
(1832 ed., p. 143; HUD1, p. 366) adds to the Drayton note:
[Steevens cites Decker’s Honest Whore [[see 1778 note above]].]
1833 valpy
valpy ≈ standard
3622+1 margent] Valpy (ed. 1833): “i.e. the margin of a book which contains explanatory notes. The whole of this dialogue is a ridicule on the court jargon of our author’s time.”
1843 col1
col1 : standard
3622+1 margent] Collier (ed. 1843) : “Horatio (whose interruption is not in the folio) refers to the explanatory comment upon the body of a work, sometimes inserted in the margin of the page.”
1844 verp
verp col1 w/o attribution (minus parenthetical comment)
3622+1 margent])
1854 del2
del2
3622+1-3622+2 Hora. I . . . done] Delius (ed. 1854) : Hamlet begnügt sich nicht mit dem Text der Rede Osrick’s, sondern verlangt noch die erklärenden Anmerkungen hinzu, die in alten Büchern an den Rand geschrieben waren. Dasselbe Bild findet sich auch in [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)] what obscur’d in this fair volume lies, find written in the margin of his eyes.”[ “Hamlet does not satisfy himself with the text of Osrick’s speech; on the contrary, he demands still the clarifying commentary which were written in the margin of old books. This same image one finds also in Romeo and Juliet Act 1.3 what obscur’d in this fair volume lies, find written in the margin of his eyes.” ]
1856 hud1 (1851-6)
hud1 : cald2 without attribution
3622+1 margent] Hudson (ed. 1856) : “The gloss or commentary in old books was usually on the margin of the leaf. See [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)] note 6.”
1856 sing2
sing2 = sing1
3622+1 margent]
1857 elze1
elze1
3622+1 margent] Elze (ed. 1857, 255-6): <p. 255>"Diese Rede des Horatio fehlt in den Fs. Horatio will sagen: Dies Kauderwelsch ist so unverständlich, dass ich vorherwusste, ihr würdet noch durch die Erklärung und Inhaltsangabe desselben erbauet werden müssen, ehe </p. 255> <p. 256>ihr damit fertig würdet. Theobald und Warburton lassen diese Bemerkung bei Seite gesprochen werden.—’The margin’ ist die an den Rand gedruckte Inhaltsangabe und Erklärung." ["Horatio’s speech is absent in the Ff. Horatio wants to say: ’This gibberish is so incomprehensible, that I knew before the clarity and summary might have yet to be constructed before it would be finished.Theobald and Warburton allow this remark to be spoken as an aside.. —’The margin’ is the printed summary and explanation on the margin."].
1858 col3
col3 = col1
3622+1 margent]
1861 wh1
whi : standard
3622+1-3622+2 I . . . done] White (ed. 1861) : “i.e. receive an explanation like that furnished by a marginal note.”
1864-68 c&mc
c&mc ≈ standard
3622+1 margent] Clarke & Clarke (ed. 1864-68, rpt. 1874-78, Glossary):
3622+1 margent] Clarke & Clarke (ed. 1864-68, rpt. 1874-78): “Explanatory coments of books were anciently printed on the margin of the pages. See Note 57, Act I, [Rom.].”
1869 tsch
tsch
3622+1 margent] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “margent für margin. Unter den Zahnlauten tritt t leicht an einen Endconsonanten. cf. parchemin, parchment. M.I. 177.” [margent for margin. Among the dental consonants, t appears easily as the final consonant. cf. parchemin, parchment. M.I. 177.]
1872 del4
del4 = del2 + VN
3622+1-3622+2 Hora. I . . . done]
1872 cln1
cln1 : standard
3622+1 margent] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “the margin, where the comment was frequently given. Compare [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)]: ‘And what obscured in this fair volume lies, Find written in the margent of his eyes.’”
1872 hud2
hud2 ≈ hud1
3622+1 margent] Hudson (ed. 1881): “‘I knew you would have to be instructed by a marginal commentary.’ The allusion is to printing of comments in the margin of books. So in [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)]: ‘And what obscured in this fair volume lies, Find written in the margent of his eyes.’”
1873 rug2
rug2 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent] Moberly (ed. 1873): “Instructed by a gloss or explanation in the margin.”
1877 v1877
v1877 ; hud1-2?
3622+1 margent] Furness (ed. 1877): “In old books explanatory comments were printed in the margin. See [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)].”
1877 col4
col4 : col3
3622+1 margent] Collier (ed. 1877): “As in books, where explanations are sometimes given in the margins.”
1881 hud3
Hud3 = hud2
3622+1 margent] Hudson (ed. 1881): “‘I knew you would have to be instructed by a marginal commentary.’ The allusion is to printing of comments in the margin of books. So in [Rom. 1.3.86 (432)]: ‘And what obscured in this fair volume lies, Find written in the margent of his eyes.’”
1883 wh2
wh2 ≈ wh1
3622+1 margent] White (ed. 1883): “by the explanatory notes upon the margin.”
1885 macd
macd
3622 MacDonald (ed. 1885): “a new word, unknown to Hamlet:—court-slang, to which he prefers the old-fashioned, homely word.”
macd
3622+1 margent] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “—as of the Bible, for a second interpretative word or phrase.”
1885 mull
mull ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1889 Barnett
Barnett
3622+1 margent] Barnett (1889, p. 64): <p. 64> “the marginal reading, the comment. A doublet of margin, with excrescent t. Cf [MND 2.1.85 (460)].” </p. 64>
1899 ard1
ard1 ≈ v1877 w/o attribution
3622+1 margent]
1905 rltr
rltr : standard
3622+1 margent]
1906 nlsn
nlsn: standard
3622+1 margent] Neilson (ed. 1906, Glossary)
1931 crg1
crg1 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1934 cam3
cam3 : standard
3622+1 margent] Wilson (ed. 1934)
3622+1 margent] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary)
1939 kit2
Kit2 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
3622+1 margent] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary):
1937 pen1a
pen1a : standard
3622+1 margent]
1938 parc
parc ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1942 n&h
n&h=nlsn
3622+1 margent]
1947 cln2
cln2 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
cln2
3622+1 edified] Rylands (ed. 1947): “enlightened.”
1951 alex
Alex ≈ standard
3622+1 margent] Alexander (ed. 1951, Glossary)
1951 crg2
crg2=crg1
3622+1 margent]
1954 sis
sis ≈ standard
3622+1 margent] Sisson (ed. 1954, Glossary):
1957 pel1
pel1 : standard
3622+1 margent]
1970 pel2
pel2=pel1
3622+1 margent]
1974 EVNS1
evns1 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1980 pen2
pen2 : standard +
3622+1 margent] Spencer (ed. 1980): “I expected that you would fail to understand something he said and have some word or phrase explained.”
pen2
3622+1 edified] Spencer (ed. 1980): “enlightened.”
1982 ARD2
ard2
3622 Jenkins (ed. 1982): “What do you refer to as . . . ?”
ard2 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1984 chal
chal : standard
3622+1 margent]
1985 CAM4
CAM4 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
3622+1 edified]
1987 OXF4
oxf4 ≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1988 bev2
bev2: standard
3622+1 margent]
1993 dent
dentstandard
3622+1 margent]
1992 fol2
fol2≈ standard
3622+1 margent]
1998 OED
OED
3622+1 margent] OED A n 1 b. The margin of a book as being the place for a commentary upon or summary of the text; hence, the commentary or summary itself. 1579 W. WILKINSON Confut. Familye of Loue 48 These his vayne payntyngs of his margent, shall hereafter make his cause more odious. 1589 LYLY Pappe w. Hatchet Wks. 1902 III. 413 Beware my Comment, tis odds the margent shall bee as full as the text. 1592 SHAKS. Rom. & Jul. I. iii. 86 And what obscur’d in this faire volume lies, Find written in the Margent of his eyes. 1602; Ham. V. ii. 162. [etc.]
3622 3622+1 3622+2