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Line 3619, etc. - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

3619-20 of the carriages in faith, are very | deare to fancy, very responsiue to 
1869 tsch
tsch
3619 carriages] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “carriage, mlat. carochium, it. carozza, altfr. caroche zu lat. carrus, is zunächst ein Fuhrwerk, u. engl. carriage eine Lafette; von späterem to carry abgeleitet ist der Ausdruck allerdings eine wunderliche euphuistische Erfindung.” [“carriage, Med. Latin carochium, Italian carozza, Old French caroche to Latin carrus is first a cart and English carriage a gun carriage; the expression to be sure is a wonderful, euphuistic device derived later from to carry.”]
tsch
3619-20 very deare to fancy] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “dear to fancy, köstlich sich vorzustellen. Bei einer Anzahl von Adjectiven wie leicht, schwer, wichtig, nothwendig, schön, angenehm, unangenehm, neu u.a., bei denen eine Thätigkeit hinzuzufügen ist, rücksichtlich deren, oder für welche die Eigenschaft statt hat, wird der Inf. des Activ mit to in der Bedeutung des lat. supinum auf—u, welches zum Theil mit dem von ad begleiteten Gerundium wechseln kann, gebraucht. Die abstract gefasste Thätigkeit hat ihr Subject nicht an dem Gegenstande, welchem das Adj. angehört. Cf. For wonderful indeed are all his works, Pleasant to know. [[P.L. 3, 702]. M.III. 41.”] [dear to fancy, to present oneself ornately. By a quantity of adjectives as light, serious, important, noteworthy, attractive, pleasant, unpleasant, new and so on, by which a quality is added, with regard to which or for which the quality occurs, the infinitive of the active is used with to in the sense of the Latin supine for—u, to which part one can vary with the attending gerundive by ad. The abstract prepared quality doesn’t have its subject with the item to which the adjective belongs. Cf. For wonderful indeed are all his works, Pleasant to know. [[P.L. 3, 702]. M.III. 41.]
tsch
3620 very responsiue to the hilts] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “responsive to the hilts im Sinne von suiting to; wie Ham. [[3624-5]] more german to the matter—der Sache angemessener. So ist auch delicate=beautiful, pleasing to the eye dem gewählteren Englisch verblieben. S. Sam. Johns. E.D. s.v. delicate.” [“responsive to the hilts in the sense of suiting to, as Ham. [[3624-5]] more german to the matter—the matter to be sure. So remains in select English even delicate=beautiful, plesing to the eye. S. Sam. Johns. E.D. s.v. delicate.”]
[Ed: We’ll need to check Johnson’s Dictionary for delicate.]
1877 neil
neil
3620 responsiue] Neil (ed. 1877, Notes): “answerable, suitable.”
1883 wh2
wh2
3619-20 very deare to fancy] White (ed. 1883): “very precious, according to the Osric of our day. In time names change a little: men it would seem not at all.”
1885 macd
macd
3620 fancy] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “imagination, taste, the artistic faculty.”
macd
3620 responsiue] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “‘corresponding to—going well with the hilts,’—in shape, ornament, and colour.’”
1899 ard1
ard1
3620 responsiue] Dowden (ed. 1899): “closely corresponding.”
1906 nlsn
nlsn
3620 responsiue] Neilson (ed. 1906, Glossary): “suitable, matching.”
1931 crg1
crg1 ≈ standard
3620 deare to fancy]
crg1 ≈ Onions
3620 responsiue to] Craig (ed. 1951): “probably, well balanced; corresponding closely (Onions).”
1934 Wilson
Wilson
3620 responsiue] Wilson (1934, 1:123) lists the uncorrected reponsiue of the Devonshire, Elizabethan Club of New York, British Library, and Folger copies of Q2 compared with the corrected responsiue in the Capell copy in Trinity College, and Grimston of the Bodleian Library copy of the Q2 as an example of a corrector interceding between Shakespeare and the Q2.” Wilson later (1:131) characterizes this change as an attempt to “supply omitted letters.”
3620 responsiue] See also n. 3610+3.
1934 cam3
cam3
3619 carriages] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary): (ii)(a) an affected word for ‘hanger’ (q.v. [see n. 3618]) (b) gun-carriage.”
cam3
3620 deare] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary): “rare, precious, unusual.”
cam3
3620 responsiue to] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary): “well matched with.”
1939 kit2
kit2 ≈ standard
3619 carriages] Kittredge (ed. 1936, Glossary):
kit2 ≈ standard
3620 deare to fancy]
kit2 ≈ standard
3620-21 responsiue to the hilts]
kit2 ≈ standard
3620 responsiue to] Kittredge (ed. 1936, Glossary):
1938 parc
parc ≈ standard
3620 responsiue to]
1942 n&h
n&h ≈ standard
3620 responsiue to]
1947 cln2
cln2 ≈ standard
3619 carriages]
1951 crg2
crg2=crg1
3620 deare to fancy]
crg2=crg1
3620 responsiue to]
1957 pel1
pel1 : standard
3620 deare to fancy]
pel1 : standard
3620 responsiue to]
1970 pel2
pel2=pel1
3620 deare to fancy]
pel2=pel1
3620 responsiue to]
1974 evns1
evns1 ≈ standard
3619 carriages]
3620 deare to fancy]
3620 responsiue to]
1980 pen2
pen2 ≈ standard
3619 carriages]
evns1 ≈ standard
3620 deare to fancy]
evns1 ≈ standard
3620 responsiue to]
1982 ard2
ard2
3619-20 very . . . conceit] Jenkins (ed. 1982): “Hangers were often richly ornamented, wherefore: pleasing to the fancy, matching the hilts in design, finely wrought ((delicate)) with lavish ((liberal)) ingenuity.”
1984 chal
chal : standard
3619 carriages]
1985 cam4
cam4 ≈ standard
3620 deare to fancy]
cam4 ≈ standard
3620 responsiue to]
1987 oxf4
oxf4 ≈ standard ; OED
3619 carriages] Hibbard (ed. 1987): “OED carriage 30a, citing no other instance, suggests that this use was an affected one. More affectation follows.” [OED30. a. The loop attached to the sword-belt, through which one passed his sword. Obs. (Perh. only an affectation.)[citing this TLN]]
oxf4 ≈ standard ; OED
3620 responsiue to]
oxf4 ≈ standard
3620 deare to fancy]
1988 bev2
bev2: standard (cam4)
3619 carriages]
bev2: standard
3620 deare to fancy]
bev2: standard
3620 responsiue to]
1993 dent
dentstandard
3619 carriages]
dentstandard
3620 deare to fancy]
dentstandard
3620 responsiue to]
1992 fol2
fol2≈ standard
3619 carriages]
fol2≈ standard
3620 deare to fancy]
fol2≈ standard
3620 responsiue to]
2000 Edelman
Edelman :contra oxf4
3619 carriages] Edelman (2000): “The wheeled support on which a piece of ordnance is mounted (OED sb 27), used both for transport and as a firing platform.” Sh. refers to carriages in H5 3. Ch. 26.
“Shakespeare’s other reference to gun carriages occurs when Osric informs Hamlet, in an exchange laden with sexual punning, that Claudius’s wager for the fencing match includes ‘most delicate carriages’ [3620-1], explaining ‘the carriage sir are the hangers’ (sword-belts) [3623], eliciting Hamlet’s reply: [3624-6].”
3619 3620