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Line 3610, etc. - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

3610+3 {deede to speake fellingly of him, hee is the card or kalender of gen-}5.2.110
3610+4 {try: for you shall find in him the continent of what part a Gentle-}
3610+5 {man would see.} 3610+5
1765 john1
john1
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry] Johnson (ed. 1765) : “The general preceptor of elegance; the card by which a gentleman is to direct his course; the calendar by which he is to chuse his time, that what he does may be both excellent and seasonable.”
john1
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Johnson (ed. 1765) : “You shall find him containing and comprising every quality which a gentleman would desire to contemplate for imitation. I know not but it should be read, You shall find him the continent.”
1773 v1773
v1773 = john1
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1773 = john1
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1773 jen
jen
3610+3 fellingly]Jennens (ed. 1773) : “The first q. reads sellingly; which perhaps Shakespeare might have written; if so, he alludes to the praises and commendations the seller gives to his wares.”
[Ed: The first q. reading Jennens refers to here is the press variant [stop press?] of sellingly, which was corrected to fellingly in later printings.]
jen = john1
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1778 v1778
v1778
3610+3 fellingly] Steevens (ed. 1778) : “The first quarto reads, sellingly. STEEVENS”
v1778 = v1773
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1778 = v1773
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1783 Ritson
Ritson
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry] Ritson (1783, p. 210) : <p.210>“To do any thing by the card, says dr. Johnson, is to do it with nice observation; the card, being, according to him, the paper on which the different points of the compass were described: that is, the compass-paper itsself [sic]. But it is not. The card is a sea-chart, still so termed by mariners: and the word is afterwards used by Osrick in the same sense. Hamlets meaning will therefor be, we must speak directly foreward, in a straight line, plainly to the point.” </p. 210>
1784 ays1
ays1 = v1778 w/o attribution
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
ays1 ≈ v1778 (john1 ; minus (I know . . . You shall find him the continent.”)
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1785 v1785
v1785 = v1778
3610+3 fellingly]
v1785 = v1778
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1785 = v1778
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1787 ann
ann = v1785
3610+3 fellingly]
ann = v1785
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
ann = v1785
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1790 mal
mal = v1785
3610+3 fellingly]
mal = v1785
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
mal = v1785
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1791- rann
rann
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry] Rann (ed. 1791-) : “ the universal pattern and arbiter of elegance.”
rann
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Rann (ed. 1791-): “comprising every quality, which a gentleman would aspire to.”
1793 v1793
v1793 = v1785 + magenta underlined
3610+3 fellingly] Steevens (ed. 1793) : “So, in another of our author’s plays: ‘To things of sale a seller’s praise belongs.’ STEEVENS”
v1793 = mal
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1793 = mal
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1803 v1803
v1803 = v1793
3610+3 fellingly]
v1803 = v1793
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1803 = v1793
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1813 v1813
v1813 = v1803
3610+3 fellingly]
v1813 = v1803
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1813 = v1803
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1815 Becket
Becket
3610+3 fellingly] Becket (1815, p. 74) : <p. 74> “‘Speak feelingly.’ ‘Feelingly,’ has no sort of meaning in this place. The quarto is nearly right. We must read seelingly . Seel in Spenser and other early writers is happy . Shakspeare uses happy in the sense of proper, hndsome . He therefore makes Osrick say—’to speak properly or handsomely of him, &c. B” </p. 74>
1819 cald1
cald1
3610+3 fellingly] Caldecott (ed. 1819) : “With insight and intelligence.”
cald1 = v1813 +
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry] Caldecott (ed. 1819) : “See card , [Ham. 5.1.?(3328)] Haml.”
cald1
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]Caldecott (ed. 1819) : “Literally the contents or sum of whatever, &c.: but a quibble is also intended, ‘a specimen or exhibition of such part of the continent or whole world of man, as a gentleman need see.’ And in the same way in [LLL. 4.1.109 (1096)]. Boyet calls Rosaline, ‘my continent of beauty,’ i.e. universe of beauty, the whole , that it contains . Johnson in his Dict. says, the use of this word in this sense (it is very frequent in Shakespeare) is confined to our author.”
1821 v1821
v1821 = v1813
3610+3 fellingly]
v1821 = v1813
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1821
3610+3 card] Boswell (ed. 1821, 21:Glossary): “a sea-chart.”
v1821 = v1813
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
v1821
3610+4 continent] Boswell (ed. 1821, 21:Glossary): “that which contains.”
1826 sing1
sing1 = v1821
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
sing1 = v1821
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1832 cald2
cald2 = cald1
3610+3 fellingly]
cald2 = cald1
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
cald2 : cald1
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Caldecott (ed. 1832) : “In its more obvious sense, ‘the contents, or the whole sum of whatever,’ &c., as ‘ continent and summary.’ M. of V. III.2. Bass.; or, it may be construed, as Milton his Defensio secunda , ‘methinks I seem to journey over tracts of continent and wide extended regions,’ &c. i.e. continental, or indeed any thing: for there is nothing, however forced or fantastical, that shall be pronounced false in the mouth, and in the midst of the more than Gibbono-Johnsonic inflations of this pragmatical ‘Court Water-fly.’ But a quibble is also intended, ‘a specimen or exhibition of such part of the continent or whole world of man, as a gentleman need see.’ And in the same way inLLL [repeats 1819 note on LLL].
1833 valpy
valpy ≈ standard
3610+2 excellent differences] Valpy (ed. 1833): “Distinguishing excellences.”
valpy ≈ standard
3610+3 card] Valpy (ed. 1833): “Compass or chart.”
valpy ≈ john1 (minus “I know . . . continent”)
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
1843 col1
col1
3610+3 fellingly ] Collier (ed. 1843) : “feelingly]] So all the 4tos. but that of 1604, which has sellingly : which may be right
1854 del2
del2
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]Delius (ed. 1854) : “An ihm lässt adliges Wesen (gentry) wie auf einer Karte oder in einem Kalender also nach Ort und Zeit studiren.” [In him the noble gentry allow him to be as a card or in a calendar, also to study according to space and time.]
1856 sing2
sing2 = sing1
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
sing2 = sing1+ magenta underlined
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Singer (ed. 1856) : “But it may be superfluous to aim at the meaning of Osric’s affected jargon.”
1856 Ramsay
Ramsay
3610+1-3610+4 Ramsay (1856, pp. 123-24): <p. 123> “Laertes became what his father wished and intended him to be, a finished gentleman, a perfect man of the world; in the poet’s own words— [cites 3610+1-+4]. While Hamlet is at once ready to forgive and forget, nay, to make the first advance towards reconciliation, with ‘I am very sorry, good Horatio, That to Laerts I forgot myself,’ Laertes stands on minute points of honour, and ‘Will no reconcilement, ‘Till by some elder masters of known honour I have a voice and precedent of peace.’ Bishop Warburton and others speak of Laertes as a ‘good character.’ What these gentlemen’s notions of ‘goodness’ were they have not explained; unless they were peculiarly eccentric, it is somewhat difficult to conceive that they could have read the play with sufficient attention to </p. 123> <p. 124>observe, that before the fatal encounter between Hamlet and himself, while the unsuspicious Hamlet presumes at once ‘These foils have all all a length,’ Laertes not only arranges beforehand, in compliance with the king’s suggestion, to have an ‘unbated sword,’ but of himself proposes to steep the point of that weapon in a deadly poison; ‘For the purpose I’ll anoint my sword,’ is his own proposal.” </p. 124>
1857 elze1
Elze1
3610+3 fellingly ] Elze (ed. 1857, 254): <p. 254>"feelingly]] So lesen QC folgg.; QB: sellingly. In QA ist, wie in den Fs, die ganze Unterredung sehr kurz und dürftig." [So reads Q2 (c) ff; Q2 (u) sellingly. In Q1, as in Ff, the entire conversation is very short and poor.]
elze1 = john1 +
3610+3 card] Elze (ed. 1857, 254): "Vgl. §. 67 ((gentry)) und §. 208 ((card.))."
elze1≈ john1 +
3610+4 continent] Elze (ed. 1857, 254): "the content, summary. Johnson vermuthet: you shall find him the continent."
1858 col3
col3 : col1 + magenta underlined
3610+3 fellingly ] Collier (ed. 1858) : “So all the 4tos. but that of 1604, which has sellingly : and sellingly may very possibly be right, in connexion not only with ‘inventorily,’ but with ‘sale,’ as we venture to print it, not sail as always hitherto given: the reference is to the value, and speedily ‘sale’ of the qualifications of Laertes. Lower down [3610+18] ‘really’ may have been put for rarely .”
1859 Dyce3
Dyce3 : col3 + magenta underlined
3610+3 fellingly] Dyce (1859, p. 191) : <p. 191> “1. Here ‘to speak feelingly’ is, as Caldecott explains it, “to speak with insight and ingelligence.’—Mr. Collier’s strange fancy that ‘sellingly may very possibly be right’ was suggested by a note of Steevens.” </p. 191>
1864 ktly
ktly : standard
3610+3 card] Keightley (ed. 1864 [1866]: Glossary): “sea-chart.”
ktly : standard
3610+4 continent] Keightley (ed. 1864 [1866]: Glossary): “that which contains or encloses.”
1864-68 c&mc
c&mc
3610+4 continent] Clarke & Clarke (ed. 1864-68, rpt. 1874-78): “You shall find him to be the container and compriser of whatsoever meritorious accomplishment one gentleman would wish to behold in another.’ By ‘the card or calendar of gentry’ Osric probably means one of those ‘books of good manners’ mentioned by Touchstone in the passage referred to in Note 37 Act v., [AYL].”
1869 tsch
tsch
3610+3 fellingly] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “feelingly]] Gewissermassen: handgreiflich, also: augenfällig, oder stilistish: um ein sinnlcihes Bild von ihm zu gebrauchen.” [feelingly]] as it were: evident, also, obvious or stylish; according to the physical image employed of him.]
tsch
3610+4-3610+5 the continent . . . see] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “Das Ganze eines jeglichen Theiles, den ein Cavalier nur zu sehen wünscht.” [The totality of such parts, which a gentleman would only see.]
1872 del4
del4 = del2
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]Delius (ed. 1854) : “An ihm lässt adliges Wesen (gentry) wie auf einer Karte oder in einem Kalender also nach Ort und Zeit studiren.(vgl. 5.1.131 (3328-9), Anm. 31). ” [“In him the noble gentry allow him to be as a card or in a calendar, also to study according to space and time.” ]
1872 cln1
cln1
3610+2 differences] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “distinctions marking him out from the rest of men. This affected phrase was probably suggested by the heraldic use of the word.”
cln1 ≈ cald2 w/o attribution
3610+3 card] See [5.1.131 (3328-9)].
cln1 = john1 +
3610+3 card or kalendar of gentry] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “‘Gentry’ is here used as equivalent to ‘gentility.’ See [2.2.22 (1041)]. One of Greene’s pamphlets (1584) was called ‘Gwydonius. The carde of Fancie.’”
cln1
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “‘See [4.4.64 (0000)]. Laertes comprises in himself, like a complete map, every part or accomplishment which a gentleman would look for. ‘Part’ is here used in a double sense, first keeping up the simile of a map, and next in the same sense as in [4.7.64 (3078+7)].”
1873 rug2
rug2 ≈ standard
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry] Moberly (ed. 1873): “The card by which a gentleman is to direct his course, the calendar by which he is to know the time for everything.”
1877 v1877
v1877 :≈ cald2 ;≈ del4 ; = cln1
3610+2 differences]
v1877 : jen (paraphrase) ; col1 (paraphrase) ; v1793 (subst; identifies STEEVEN’s vague ref to LLL. 4.3.240 (1590)] ) ; cald2 ; Dyce (1859’s Strictures)
3610+3 fellingly] Furness (ed. 1877): “Indeed, no interpretation, however far-fetched, would seem out of place in this scene; perhaps the farther the better.”
[Ed: This is a response to STEEVEN’s LLL parallel].
v1877 = john1 ; ≈ cln1 (only “One of Greene’s . . . carde of Fancie.”)
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
v1877 : = cln1
3610+3 gentry] Clark & Wright (apud Furness, ed. 1877): “Equivalent to gentility. See [2.2.22 (1041)].”
v1877 = john1 ; ≈ cln1 (only”’Part’ is here . . . as in 4.7.74 (3078+7)]”)
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Clark & Wright (apud Furness, ed. 1877): “‘Part’ is here used in a double sense, first keeping up the simile of a map, and next in the same sense as in [4.7.74 (3078+7)].”
1877 col4
col4 : col3
3610+3 fellingly] Collier (ed. 1877) : “So all the 4tos. but that of 1604, which has sellingly, which may be right, in reference to the ‘quick sale’ spoken of by Hamlet just afterwards: ‘sale’ has usually been spelt sail, but, we think wrongly.”
1882 elze2
Elze2
3610+3fellingly] Elze ( ed. 1882): “Compare [MM 1.2.36 (132)]: ‘Do I speak feelingly now?’ [TN 2.3.172 (850)]: ‘He shall find himself most feelingly personated.’ Marston, The Malcontent, I, 6 (Works, ed. Halliwell, II, 217): ‘To speake feelingly.’”
3610+3 card or kalender] Elze (ed. 1882): “Compare Locrine, V, 4 (Malone’s Supplement, II, 259): Locrine, the map of magnanimity.’”
1885 macd
macd ≈standard
3610+3 card or kalender]
macd
3610+3 fellingly] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “Is this a stupid attempt at wit on the part of Osricke—’to praise him as if you wanted to sell him’—stupid because it acknowledges exaggeration?”
macd
3610+4 part] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “I think part here should be plural; then the passage would paraphrase thus: —’you shall find in him the sum of what parts (endowments) a gentleman would wish to see.’”
1889 Barnett
Barnett
3610+4 continent] Barnett (1889, p. 63): <p. 63>“that which completely contains; as a card or chart of a continent contains a complete representation of the continent.” </p. 63>
1890 irv2
irv2 : standard (via v1877)
3610+3-3610+4 gentry] Symons (in Irving & Marshall, ed. 1890): “gentility.”
irv2 = john1 (via v1877)
3610+3 the card or kalendar of gentry]
1891 oxf1
oxf1 : standard
3610+3 gentry] Craig (ed. 1891: Glossary): “sub. courtesy, [Ham. 2.2.22 (1041)].”
1899 ard1
ard1 ≈ cln1 w/o attribution
3610+2 differences] Dowden (ed. 1899): “In heraldry a difference (alteration of or addition to a coat of arms) distinguishes a junior member or branch of a family from the chief line.”
ard1
3610+3 fellingly] Dowden (ed. 1899): “feelingly]] with just perception. Compare [TN 2.3.172 (850)]. [Q2] misprints sellingly.”
ard1 ≈ cln1 w/o attribution
3610+3 card or kalendar of gentry]
ard1 ≈ cln1 w/o attribution
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see] Dowden (ed. 1899): “summary, sum and substance of the qualities a gentleman would desire to contemplate, with a play on the geographical meanings of continent and part, suggested by card. Nicholson proposes parts, as in [4.7.74 (3078+7)].”
1906 nlsn
nlsn : standard
3610+3-3610+4 gentry] Neilson (ed. 1906, Glossary)
nlsn : standard
3610+4 continent] Neilson (ed. 1906, Glossary)
1909 Rushton
Rushton
3610+2-3610+15 excellent differences . . . wrap . . . rawer breath] Rushton (1909, pp. 27): <p.27> “Osric speaks of Laertes as a gentleman of most excellent differences, and the zealous Poet speaks of the maiden Queen’s most excellent parts [ref. to King Henry V., Act iv. Scene 1: ’”Tis not the balm . . . labour to his grave.”]. Hamlet says, ‘to divide him inventorily would dizzy the arithmetic of memory;’ and afterwards he says, ‘Why do we wrap the gentleman in our more rawer breath?’—that is, Why do we, instead of distributing every part of Laertes’ most excellent differences, wrap themup in a few words entirely comprehending them? The rawer breath may represent ‘fewer words.’ A commentator suggests ‘warp’ for ‘wrap’ twice in his description of </p.27><p.28> this Figure, the Distributor, to which Shakespeare here refers.”
FNC: See also 257-67
1931 crg1
crg1 ≈ standard
3610+3 fellingly]feelingly]]
crg1 ≈ standard
3610+3 card
crg1 ≈ standard
3610+4 gentry]
crg1 ≈ standard
3610+4 continent
1934 Wilson
Wilson
3610+1-3610+25, Wilson (1934, 1:31-32): <p. 31> “Finally we come to a pair of longish cuts in the last scene of the play (5.2.110-50, 203-18). The first of them abridges the Osric episode and throws overboard that fop’s very difficult description of Laertes, together with Hamlet’s scarcely less difficult rejoinder. In this the abridger has our understanding if not our sympathy, while once again his manner of going to work shows the craftsman’s hand. Indeed, it is in this cut, of all the cuts in the text, that the presence of his hand is most unmistakable. To have deleted forty-ones and done no more would have broken the thread of the dialogue, since it would have removed all reference to Laertes and his weapon, and so left what follows without meaning. The abridger accordingly mended his rent by reading ‘Sir, you are not ignorant of what excellence Laertes it at his weapon’, a sentence which does not actually occur in Q2, though every word of it is Shake- </p. 31> <p. 32>
1934 Wilson
Wilson
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (1934, 1:123) lists the uncorrected sellingly as found in the Devonshire, Elizabethan Club of New York, British Library, and Folger copies of Q2, as compared with the corrected fellingly as found in the Capell copy of Trinity College, and Grimston in the Bodleian Library copies of Q2. Wilson suggests that this suggests a corrector’s presence between Q2 and the Sh. manuscript.
Wilson
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (1934, 1:129): <p. 129>“It will have been noticed that, whereas in this forme [outer forme N of the printing process] seven of the corrections are found in the B.M., Capell, and Grimston copies, two of them, ‘fellingly’ and ‘responsiue’ occur in Capell and Grimston only, a state of affairs which makes it certain that the forme was twice corrected, so that we have copies in three different states. First of all there was the printing which produced the uncorrected state (State A), in the Devonshire, Huth and Folger copies. Next, seven corrections were made (Corr. I), ‘thereby’, ‘fall’, ‘dazzie’, ‘raw’, doo’t’, ‘be might hangers’, ‘A did so sir’, which produced State B in which the B.M. copy was printed. Next, two further corrections were made (Corr. II), ‘fellingly’ and ‘responsiue’, which produced State C in which the Capell and Grimston copies were printed. There is nothing surprising in this. Double correction in the same fome is to be found in others books of the period; and Dr. Greg, with whose help I have been able to work out this particular problem, finds a similar case in the Pied Bull Quarto of King Lear.” </p. 129>
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (1934, 1:131) characterizes this as a miscorrection for a misunderstanding of Shakespeare’s meaning of sellingly.
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (1934, 2:293-94): <p. 293> The reading ‘feelingly’ which has been accepted practically universally is an emendation by the compositor of Q4 of ‘fellingly’ in the copy of Q2, which he used, and ‘fellingly’ in turn is nothing but a miscorrection of ‘sellingly’. Thus, though ‘feelingly’ gives good sense (=‘justly’, cf. [TN 2.3.172-3 (0000)], ‘most feelingly personated’), it possesses very slight textual authority. Nevertheless, the insignificant graphical and typographical difference between ‘f’ and ‘f’ together </p. 293> <p. 294> with the propensity of the Q2 compositor to omit letters, would make ‘feelingly’ a possible if not an acceptable reading, provided the original reading ‘sellingly’ were itself impossible. It is, howeer, as Steevens pointed out, very far from being so. By ‘to speak sellingly’ Osric means ‘to speak as a shopman would’, i.e. he advertises the excellencies of Laertes like a merchant trying to sell his goods, a type of praise which contemporaries found particularly distasteful, as is clear from [LLL 4.3.240 (0000)], ‘To things of sale a seller’s praise belongs,’ and Son. 21.14 ‘I will not praise that purpose not to sell.’ That Hamket takes the word in this sense is, I think, proved by the fact that ‘sellingly’ gives the clue to the otherwise obscure ridicule which the Prince heaps upon Osric; ‘inventorily’, ‘th’arithmetic of memory’, the pun in ‘his quick sail’ (sale), ‘extolment’, ‘of great article’, ‘dearth and rareness’—all are intended to suggest the chapman cracking up his wares. It may be objected that Osric does not actually speak ‘sellingly’ since his metaphors are drawn from the sea (i.e. ‘card’, ‘calendar’, ‘continent’). The reply to this, I think, is that in the first part of his praise he does talk shop (e.g. ‘full of most excellenct differences’, etc.) The jest is that he mixes shop talk and ship talk indiscriminately together.” </p. 294>
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (1934, 1:126-27): <p. 126> “This third point [that the variants found in the British Museum, Grimston, and Capell copies of Q2 with a corrected outer sheet N have no authority] is an important editorial fact, inasmuch as at least two of these ‘corrections’ are to be found in most modern texts, viz. ‘fellingly’ (interpreted ‘feelingly’), and ‘doo’t’, while ‘raw’ also finds its defenders from time to time. Yet, it may be categorically stated that, except for ‘thirtie’ and the three passages with omissions at ll. 159, 167, 195 [3620, 3626, 3651], the uncorrected readings in this forme are none of them in need of correction, though ‘dosie’ is no doubt an old-fashioned spelling. As for the omissions, apart from the case of ‘reponsiue’, which at first escaped his eye, the corrector guessed wrong at l. 195 [3651], as F1 ‘He did Complie with his Dugge’ indicates, though when confronted at l. 167 [3626] with the sentence ‘I would it be hangers till then’ he could hardly help seeing that the word ‘might’ had been omitted. He accordingly, we must </p. 126> <p. 127> suppose, wrote it in the margin of the sheet and directed the compositor to insert it. The latter did so; and had to reset four lines of type to get it in. Nevertheless, after all this trouble, he actually introduced the word at the wrong place, so that the corrected sheet gives us ‘I would it be might hangers till then’! The point is eloquent of the kind fo workmen we have to deal with.” </p. 127>
Wilson
3610+4 part] Wilson (1934, 2:238-39): <p. 238> “we have no F1 parallel, and as I think that here Q2 is incorrect, the matter is one of emendation and falls to be considered later.2” </p. 238>
<n> <p. 238> “2Vide pp. 300-01” </p. 238> </n>
3610+4 part] Wilson (1934, 2:300-01): <p. 300> “The culprit in the fourth instance [of confusion over singular and plural] was almost certainly the Q2 compositor, not Shakespeare. [cites3610+3-3610+5] runs the final flourish of Osric’s description of Laertes </p. 300> <p. 301>according to Q2. Editors have ben chary of touching the Osric episode because they have failed to follow the sequence of thought behind the verbiage, but Nicholson conjectured ‘parts’ for ‘part’ and he was assuredly right. Osric uses ‘parts’ in two senses: (I) abilities, talents (the usual meaning in Shakespeare) and (ii), playing on the word ‘continent’, foreign parts, which ‘a gentleman would see’ on his travels.” </p. 301>
1934 cam3
cam3 : ≈ v1877 w/o attribution (jen ; col1 ; v1793) ; Wilson
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (ed. 1934): “sellingly]](Q2 some copies) Other copies ‘fellingly’—which is a press-corrector’s emendation, cf. MSH. pp. 123-31. Most edd. read with Q4 [or Q3] ‘feelingly’ (=with discernment, cf. [TN 2.3.172 (850)]). But I agree with Steevens, Jennens and Collier that ‘sellingly’ is right; cf. [LLL. 4.3.240 (1590) ‘To things of sale a seller’s praise belongs,’ and [Son. 21.14 ‘I will not praise that purpose not to sell.’ Osric has been speaking like a shopman advertising his wares (e.g. ‘excellent differences . . . and great showing’); and the jest is that he no sooner announces his intention of doing so than he deserts the language of the shop for that of the ship. Cf. note ll. 117-24. [3610+6-+12].”
cam3 : standard
3610+3 fellingly] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary): “sellingly]] in commercial language (v. note [above].”
cam3 ≈ standard +
3610+3-+4card or kalendar of gentry] Wilson (ed. 1934): “v. G[lossary]. ‘card,’ ‘calendar.’
3610+3-+4card] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary)
3610+3 kalendar] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary, calendar)
3610+3-+4 gentry] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary)
cam3 ≈ standard +
3610+4 continent] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary): “(ii) (a) summary, embodiment, (b) geographical continent (to suit ‘card’).”
cam3 ≈ standard +
3610+4 part] Wilson (ed. 1934): “No one has followed Nicholson; yet he is surely right. Osric is deep in maritime metaphor: Laer. is the ‘continent’ of gentry and contains in himself all those ‘parts’ that a gentleman would wish to see (upon his travels), v.G[lossary].”
3610+4 part] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary): “foreign parts.”
1934 rid1
rid1 : cam3 w/o attribution
3610+3 fellingly] Ridley (ed. 1934, Glossary, sellingly):
1939 kit2
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+2 great showing]
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+3 fellingly] feelingly]]
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+3-3610+4card or kalendar of gentry]
3610+4 gentry] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary):
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+4 part] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary):
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+4 continent]
3610+4 continent] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary):
kit2
3610+4 what] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary): “whatever.”
1937 pen1a
pen1a : standard
3610+3-3610+4card]
1938 parc
parc≈ standard
3610+3-3610+4card]
parc≈ standard
3610+4 continent]
parc ≈ Ard1?
3610+3 fellingly] feelingly]]
1942 N&H
N&H ≈ standard
3610+4 continent]
1947 cln2
cln2 ≈ standard
3610+3-3610+4card or kalendar of gentry]
cln2 ≈ standard
3610+4 continent]
cln2 ≈ standard
3610+4 part]
1951 crg2
crg2=crg1
3610+3 fellingly] feelingly]]
crg2=crg1
3610+3 card
crg2=crg1
3610+4 gentry]
crg2=standard
3610+4 continent] Craig (ed. 1954, Glossary)
1954 sis
sis ≈ standard
3610+4 continent] Sisson (ed. 1954, Glossary):
1956 Sisson
Sisson
3610+3 fellingly] Sisson (1956, 2:227): <p. 227>“Some copies of the Quarto read sellingly, followed by some editors, including New Cambridge. Folio omits. sellingly, ‘as a salesman’, is quite out of character for Osric, and is very forced here. The Q4 reading, feelingly, is entirely idiomatic, relevant and natural here, and gives the original copy misread easily by the compositor of Q2.”
1957 pel1
pel1 : standard
3610+3 fellingly] feelingly]] Farnham (ed. 1957): "appropriately."
pel1 : standard
3610+3 card
pel1 : standard
3610+4 gentry]
pel1: cam3a
3610+4 continent]
1970 pel2
pel2=pel1
3610+3 fellingly] feelingly]]
pel2=pel1
3610+3 card
pel2=pel1
3610+4 gentry]
pel1: cam3a
3610+4 continent]
1974 evns1
evns1≈ standard
3610+3 card
evns1≈ standard
3610+4 gentry]
evns1≈ standard
3610+4 continent]
evns1 ≈ cam3 +
3610+3 fellingly] Evans (ed. 1974): “sellingly]] Most editors follow Q3 in reading feelingly=with exactitude, as he deserves.”
1980 pen2
pen2
3610+1-3610+5 absolute . . . see] Spencer (ed. 1980): “Osrick’s panegyric has been arranged by the King ((IV.7.130 [3121])).”
pen2 ≈ standard
3610+3 card
pen2 ≈ standard
3610+3-3610+4 kalendar of gentry]
pen2 ≈ standard
3610+4 gentry]
pen2 ≈ standard
3610+4 continent]
pen2cam3 w/o attribution
3610+4 part]
1982 ard2
ard2 ≈ standard
3610+4 gentry]
ard2
3610+3 card or kalendar] Jenkins (ed. 1982): “model or paradigm. Two words for the same thing. A card is literally a chart or map, a calendar a register or directory.”
ard2
3610+4 continent] Jenkins (ed. 1982): “container, as at [4.4.64. See next note [3610+5 what part].”
ard2 : contra Wilson (MSH)
3610+4 what part] Jenkins (ed. 1982): “whatever part, any part which. This sense of what makes the emendation parts ((see MSH, p. 301)) unnecessary. A pun on part gives ((1)) ability, accomplishment as in [4.7.72], which a gentleman desires to see in another; ((2)) region ((sustaining the metaphor of card, continent)), which he desires to see on his travels.”
ard2 : contra Wilson (MSH) +
3610+3 fellingly] Jenkins (ed. 1982):” feelingly]] . . . but the word [sellingly; “defended at length by Dover Wilson] is neither authenticated nor ((from Osric)) apt.”
1984 chal
chal : standard
3610+3 card or kalendar]
chal : standard
3610+4 continent
1984 chal
chal : OED
3610+3 fellingly]feelingly
1985 cam4
cam4 ≈ standard
3610+3 card or kalendar]
cam4 ≈ standard
3610+4 gentry]
cam4 ≈ standard
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
cam4 : cam3
3610+4 continent
cam4 : cam3
3610+4 part]
1987 oxf4
oxf4 ≈ standard
3610+4 continent (ard2)?
oxf4 ≈ standard
3610+4-3610+5 for you shall find in him the continent of what part a gentleman would see]
oxf4
3610+3 fellingly] Hibbard (ed. 1987, Appendix A, p. 367): <p. 367>“feelingly]]appropriately, in a way that will do him justice (OED adv. 2)). Compare [TN 2.3.149 (850)], ‘he shall find himself most feelingly personated.’”
oxf4 : john1 ; OED +
3610+3 card or kalendar] Hibbard (ed. 1987, Appendix, p. 367): <p. 367>“This paraphrase expresses admirably what Osric means, but does not deal fully with the mixed terms in which he says it. Card, meaning chart ((OED sb. 2 3b)), belongs to the language of seamanship; whereas calendar, meaning guide or directory, belongs to that of business, especially in the Latin calendarium, signifying an account book ((OED sb. 3)). Associating card with sail, and calendar with sale, Hamlet seizes on the opening Osric gives him here for some plicated quibbling.” </p. 367>
1988 bev2
bev2: standard
3610+3 card or kalendar]
bev2: standard
3610+4 gentry]
bev2: standard
3610+4 continent]
bev2: standard
3610+4 what part]
bev2:
3610+3 fellingly] Bevington (ed. 1988): “feelingly]] with just perception.”
1992 fol2
fol2≈ standard
3610+3 card or kalendar]
fol2≈ standard
3610+4 continent
1993 dent
dent = standard
3610+3 card or kalendar]
dent = standard
3610+4 continent
2008 OED
OEDstandard
3610+3 card or kalendar] b. card of the sea, mariner’s card or sea card; = CHART n.1 1b. Obs. 1534 LD. BERNERS Gold. Bk. M. Aurel. Rvij, What profitte is it to the mariner to know the carde of the see. 1555 EDEN Decades W. Ind. II. x. (Arb.) 134 Manye of those mappes which are commonly cauled the shipmans cardes or cardes of the sea. 1594 BLUNDEVIL Exerc. VII. xxvii. (ed. 7) 690 The Mariners Card..is none other thing but a description..of the places that be in the Sea or in the land next adioyning to the Sea, as Points, Capes, Bayes. [etc.]
3610+3 3610+4 3610+5