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Line 3610, etc. - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

3610+13 {Cour. Your Lordship speakes most infallibly of him.}5.2.121
3610+14 {Ham. The concernancy sir, why doe we wrap the gentleman in}
3610+15 {our more rawer breath?} 3610+15
1773 jen
jen
3610+15 SD [To Horatio] Jennens (ed. 1773) : “T.[THEOBALD] puts in this direction, To Horatio. But Hamlet seems to direct the whole of this speech to Osrick: The concernancy, sir? i.e. Come to the business, what is your concern with me? Why do we wrap, &c. What weend we spend the time in descanting anylonger on the good qualities of Laertes, which will gain but little credit by our raw, imperfect praises?”
1791- rann
rann
3610+14 The concernancy, sir] Rann (ed. 1791-) : “To the business, sir; what is your concern with me? Why should we thus rudely canvas the qualities of Laertes ?”
1819 cald1
cald1
3610+13 infallibly of him] Caldecott (ed. 1819) : : “With the most oracular insight and fidelity.”
cald1
3610+14 The concernancy, sir] Caldecott (ed. 1819) : “The tendency of all this blazon of character? Why do we clothe this gentleman’s perfections in our humble and imperfect language? make him the subject of our rude discussion?”
1832 cald2
cald2=cald1
3610+13 infallibly of him]
cald2 = cald1
3610+14 The concernancy, sir]
1857 elze1
elze1 : theo ; warb
3610+14-3610+15 Elze (ed. 1857, 255): <p. 255>"Theobald [[?]] und Warburton lassen diese Frage an Horatio gerichtet sein.—Wegen ’more rawer’ vgl. §. 58 ((more nearer))." ["Theobald [[?]] and Warburton allow this question to be directed to Horatio.—because of ’more rawer’ compare §. 58 ((more nearer))."
1864-68 c&mc
c&mc
3610+15 rawer] Clarke (ed. 1864, Glossary): “More unskilful; with a punning involvement of another meaning of the word ‘Raw,’—cold with damp.”
3610+15 rawer] Clarke & Clarke (ed. 1864-68, rpt. 1874-78): “This word, used here, is in keeping with what we conceive to be the right word (‘raw’) in the passage discussed in the penultimate note. Hamlet asks, ‘But to return to the matter that concerns us, sir? Why do we digress to envelope the gentleman in eulogium breathed forth so inexpertly and inefficiently by us?’”
1869 Romdahl
Romdahl
3610+14 concernancy] Romdahl (1869, p. 43): <p. 43> “for concern, business; nowhere else in Sh.” </p. 43>
1872 cln1
cln1
3610+15 more rawer] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “See note on [2.1.11 (902)].”
1877 v1877
v1877 ≈ cln1 w/o attribution
3610+15 more rawer] Furness (ed. 1877): “See [2.1.11 (902)].”
1881 hud3
Hud3
3610+14 concernancy] Hudson (ed. 1881): “That is, ‘How does this concern us?’”
1885 macd
macd
3610+13 MacDonald (ed. 1885): “Here is a pause, I think.”
macd
3610+14-3610+15 MacDonald (ed. 1885): “‘To the matter in hand!’—recalling the attention of Osricke to the purport of his visit.”
macd
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “‘why do we presume to talk about him with our less refined breath?’”
1889 Barnett
Barnett
3610+13 infallibly] Barnett (1889, p. 63): <p. 63>“correctly.” </p. 63>
Barnett
3610+14-+15 Ham. The . . . breath] Barnett (1889, p. 63): <p. 63>“To what truth does this talk tend? Why do we not come to the point about this gentleman?” </p. 63>
1899 ard1
ard1
3610+14 concernancy] Dowden (ed. 1899): “concernment; another affected word; no other example given in New Eng. Dict.”
ard1
3610+14-+15 why . . . breath] Dowden (ed. 1899): “Theobald took these words as spoken of Osric to Horatio; no doubt, erroneously.”
1905 rltr
rltr
3610+14 concernancy] Chambers (ed. 1905): “matter.”
1906 nlsn
nlsn: standard
3610+14 The concernancy] Neilson (ed. 1906, Glossary)
1931 crg1
crg1 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
crg1 ≈ standard
3610+15 breath]
1934 cam3
cam3
3610+14 The concernancy] Wilson (ed. 1934): “But what is it all about?”
cam3 : standard
3610+14 The concernancy] Wilson (ed. 1934, Glossary)
cam3
3610+15 more rawer] Wilson (ed. 1934): “i.e. as compared with the exquisite refinement of the ‘gentleman’ it ‘wraps.’”
1934 rid1
rid1 : standard
3610+14 The concernancy] Ridley (ed. 1934, Glossary):
1939 kit2
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary):
kit2 ≈ standard
3610+15 breath] Kittredge (ed. 1939, Glossary):
kit2
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath] Kittredge (ed. 1939): “Why do we attempt to describe the gentleman in our words, which are too crude to do him justice? ‘Words,’ as the Queen has told us, are ‘made of breath’ ([3.4.197 (2474-5)].”
1938 parc
parc ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
1947 cln2
cln2 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
cln2 ≈ standard
3610+15 more rawer]
1951 crg2
crg2 = glo
3610+14 The concernancy]
crg2 = glo
3610+15 breath]
1957 pel1
pel1 : standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
pel1 : standard
3610+15 more rawer breath]
1970 pel2
pel2=pel1
3610+14 The concernancy]
pel2=pel1
3610+15 more rawer breath]
1974 evns1
evns1 ≈ standard
3610+15 more rawer breath]
1980 pen2
pen2
3610+13 infallibly] Spencer (ed. 1980): “accurately.”
pen2 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
pen2 ≈ standard
3610+15 more rawer breath]
1982 ard2
ard2 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
ard2Kit2 w/o attribution
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath]
1984 chal
chal : standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
chal : standard
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath]
chal : v1877
3610+15 more rawer breath]
1985 cam4
cam4 ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
cam4 ≈ standard
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath]
1987 oxf4
oxf4 ≈ standard +
3610+14 The concernancy] Hibbard (ed. 1987, Appendix A, p. 368): <p. 368>“Shakespeare seems to have invented concernancy for this occasion.” </p. 368>
oxf4 ≈ standard
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath]
1988 bev2
bev2: standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
bev2: standard
3610+15 more rawer breath]
1993 dent
dent ≈ standard
3610+14 The concernancy]
dent ≈ standard
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath]
1992 fol2
fol2≈ standard
3610+14-3610+15 why . . . breath]
3610+13 3610+14 3610+15