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Line 3374-76 - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

3374-5 sand times, and {now} how | abhorred {in} my imagination {it} is: my gorge 
3375-6 rises at it. Heere | hung those lyppes that I haue kist I know not howe 
1580 Barrett
Barrett
3375 gorge] Barrett (the gorge of an hauke, #401): “Ingluvies accipitris. [throat of a hawk] lafugms. [gluttony]”
1632 Randolph
Randolph
3375-6 Heere hung those lyppes . . . kist] Thomas Randolph (The Jealous Lovers, 1632, p. 61, apud Ingleby et al. 1932, 1: 361): “It had been a mighty favour once, to have kiss’d these lips that grin so.”
1668 Skinner
Skinner
3375 gorge] Skinner (1668, gorge): “usque ad Nauseam implere, à Fr. Gorge, Engorge, It. Ingorgiare, Ingurgitare, hoc à Fr. G. Gorge, Gula, Oesophagus, q.v. Gurges, quod etiam purioribus Latinæ Linguæ fæculis pro Helluone usurpabatur. Gula autem est præ reliquis corporis partibus Helluo (i.e.) pars Helluatrix.” [to sate to the point of nausea, from the French Gorge, Engorge; Italian Ingorgiare, Ingurgitare; this from the Fr. G. Gorge, Gula, Oesophagus, see Gurges [a whirlpool] which is still used in the purer water of the Latin language for a glutton. The Gula [throat], however, is the remaining part of the body in the Glutton (i.e. the area of the gluttony)]
1734 mF3
mF3
3375 gorge] Anon. (ms. notes in F3, 1734) : “Gorge, Fr. throat or gullet.”
1755 Johnson
Johnson
3375 gorge] Johnson (1755, gorge, 1): “n.s. [gorge, French] 1. The throat; the swallow. ‘There were birds also made so finely, that they did not only deceive the sight with their figures, but the hearing with their songs,which the watry instruments did make their gorge deliver.‘ Sidney [cites Hamlet] ‘Her delicate tenderness will find itself abused, begin to heave the gorge, disrelish and abhor the Moor.’ Shakes. Othello [2.1.233 (1016)].”
1770 han3
han3 : mF3
3375 gorge] Hanmer (ed. 1770, 6:Glossary): “throat.”
1818 Todd
Todd = Johnson + magenta underlined
3375 gorge] Todd (1818, gorge, 1): “n.s. [gorge, French] 1. The throat; the swallow. ‘There were birds also made so finely, that they did not only deceive the sight with their figures, but the hearing with their songs,which thewatry instruments did make their gorge deliver.’ Sidney [cites Hamlet] ‘Her delicate tenderness will find itself abused, begin to heave the gorge, disrelish and abhor the Moor.’ Shakes. Othello [Oth 2.1.234 (1015-16)].[cites Milton Reason of Church Gov. B2]”
1819 cald1
cald1
3375 my gorge rises at it] Caldecott (ed. 1819) : “Stomach, from gorge , Fr. throat. ‘Cast the gorge ,” [Tim 4.3.41 (1643) ]Tim. “Heave the gorge , disrelish.” [Oth 2.1.233 (1016)] Iago.
1822 Nares
Nares
3375 gorge] Nares (1822; 1906): “To bear full gorge. This was said of a hawk when she was full-fed, and refused the lure. ‘No goake prevailes, she will not yeeld to might, No lure will cause her stoope, she beares full gorge.’ T. Watson, Sonnet, 47.
1832 cald2
cald2 = cald1
3375 my gorge rises at it]
1839 knt1
knt1
3375 abhorred] Knight (ed. 1839) : “disgusted.”
1854 del2
del2
3375 how abhorred in my imagination it is] Delius (ed. 1854) : “how abhorred my imagination is]] So die Fol.—abhorred = hässlich, widerwärtig, also hier von der Einbildungskraft: mit widerlichen Bildern erfüllt. Die Qs. lesen how abhorred in my imagination it is..” [hateful, disgusting, also here is an image ripe with repulsive images. The Qq read how abhorred in my imagination it is.]
1857 elze1
elze1
3375 how abhorred in my imagination it is] Elze (ed. 1857): "Vgl. Dekker Satire-Mastix ((Hawkins The Origin of the Engl. Drama, Oxford, 1773, III, 119)): My stomach rises at this scurvy leather captain."]
1860 mhal1
mhal1: Q1
3372-82 Halliwell (1860) marks the Q1CLN 2008-14 equivalent as “mutilated.”
1861 wh1
wh1 : Q1
3374 how . . . is] White (ed. 1861) : “how abhorred my imagination is]] What is abhorred? At what does Hamlet’s gorge rise? At the scull? He is not speaking of that. What he abhors, what his gorge rises at, is his imagination that here hung the lips that he has kissed . This construction is sustained by the reading of the first 4to., ‘here hung those lippes that I have kissed a hundred times, and to see now they abhorre me.’”
1866 dyce2
dyce2 : wh1
3375 how abhorred in my imagination it is] Dyce (ed. 1866): “So the quartos, 1604, &c.—Mr. Grant White—who confines the meaning of ‘it’ in that reading to the skull—prefers the lection of the folio, ‘and how abhorred my Imagination is.’”
1868 c&mc
c&mc
3375 how abhorred in my imagination it is] Clarke & Clarke (ed. 1868): “This is the reading of the Quartos; while the Folio exhibits the passage thus—’And how abhorred my imagination is!’ We believe that the reading we have adopted [Q2] is the correct one; and that ‘it’ in this sentence (and in the succeeding clause, ‘my gorge rises at it’) is used in reference to the idea of having been borne on the back of him whose skeleton remains are thus suddenly presented to the speaker’s gaze, the idea of having caressed and been fondled by one whose mouldering fleshless skull is now held in the speaker’s hand. We have pointed out manifold instances of Shakespeare’s thus using ‘it’ I reference to an implied particular. See, among many others, Notes 19 [2730] and 23 [2743+8], Act iv, of the present play.”
1869 tsch
tsch
3375 abhorred] Tschischwitz (ed. 1869): “Das Verbum to abhor hat durch den Einfluss des canonischen Rechts die eigenthümliche Bedeutung von destestari erhalten, woraus sich allmählich der Begriff ‘zurückweisen, abstossen’ entwickelt. I say again, I utterly abhor, yea, from my soul Refuse you as my judge. [[H8 2.4.81 (1438-39)]], woraus das Part. pass. abhorred, abgestossen, sich leicht erklärt.” [“The verb to abhor has received through the influence of canon law the proper meaning of destestari, from which gradually the sense “to be repulsed, thrust away’ developed. . . “]
1872 del4
del4 ≈ del2 = magenta underlined
3375 how abhorred in my imagination it is] Delius (ed. 1872) : “ how abhorred my imagination is]] So die Fol.—abhorred = hässlich, widerwärtig, also hier von der Einbildungskraft: mit widerlichen Bildern erfüllt. Die Qs. lesen how abhorred in my imagination it is und lassen zu Anfang dieser Rede Let me see aus, was sich doch in Q.A. [Q1] findet: I pr’ithee, let me see it.”[ “hateful, disgusting, also here is an image ripe with repulsive images. The Qq read how abhorred in my imagination it is and leave off from the beginning of this speech Let me see , which one finds also in Q1: I pr’ithee, let me see it.“]
1877 v1877
v1877 = wh1; clarke
3374 how . . . is] Clarke (apud Furness, ed. 1877): “‘It’ in this sentence, and in ‘my gorge rises at it,’ is used in refrence to the idea of having been borne on the back of him whose skeleton remains are thus suddenly presented to the speaker’s gaze, the idea of having caressed and been fondled by one whose mouldering fleshless skull is now held in the speaker’s hand.”
v1877: Dyce (Glossary)
3375 gorge] Dyce (apud Furness, ed. 1877): “Throat, swallow, equivalent to stomach (Fr. gorge).”
1884 Gould
Gould : wh1
3373-6 He . . . oft] Gould (1884, p. 40) : <p. 40> “He hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now how abhorred my imagination is! my gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.’]] According to this way of pointing the passage, Hamlet’s gorge rises at the thought of having while a boy been carried pickaback by the defunct. This is absurd. It should be at the stinking skull, and which he may considered as bringing closer to him and whose parts he remembers to have kissed. ‘Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft.’ I suggest that the passage should read: ‘He hath borne me on his back a thousand times. And now, how abhorred my imagination is—my gorge rises at it—here hung those lips,’ etc., so as to make Hamlet’s gorge rise at the thoguht of the part he is acting with the stinking skull which he holds at present in his hand, instead of the pickaack of a man who has been dead ‘three-and-twenty years.’” </p. 40>
1885 macd
macd
3375 abhorred] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “If this be the true reading, abhorred must mean horrified; but I incline to the Quarto [Q1’s “now they abhorre me.”]
1889 Barnett
Barnett
3375 gorge]] Barnett (1889, p. 60): <p. 60> “the throat, lit. a narrow passage. Lat. gurges, a whirlpool. A gorget was a piece of armour to protect the throat, from the Fr. form of which gorgeous is formed.”</p. 60>
1891 oxf1
oxf1
3375 gorge] Craig (ed. 1891: Glossary): “sub. the throat [WT 2.143 (641)].”
1906 nlsn
nlsn: standard
3375 gorge] Neilson (ed. 1906, Glossary)
1947 cln2
cln2 ≈ standard
3375 gorge]
1954 sis
sis ≈ standard
3375 gorge] Sisson (ed. 1954, Glossary): “what has been swallowed.”
1985 cam4
cam4 ≈ Clarke (via v1877) w/o attribution
3374 how . . . is]
cam4 ≈ standard
3375 gorge]
1992 fol2
fol2≈ standard
3375 gorge]
1993 dent
dent
3375 abhorred] Andrews (ed. 1989): “abhorrent ((literally, to be shuddered away from)).”
1998 OED
OED
3375 gorge] OED gorge 5. What has been swallowed, the contents of the stomach; in phrases (primarily of Falconry) to cast (up), heave, spue up, vomit one’s gorge.
b. Freq. used fig. in the above phrases to express extreme disgust or (in lateruse) violent resentment; now commonly one’s gorge rises (at or against).to rouse (stir) the gorge: to make furiously angry. 1532 MORE Confut. Tindale Wks. 702/1 [Preachers who] make a man ready to cast his gorge to heare them raue and rage like mad men. 1602 SHAKS. Ham. V. i. 207 How abhorred my Imagination is, my gorge rises at it. 1604 –– [etc.]
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