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Line 1340-2 - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

1340-1 Ham. I will tell you why, so shall my anticipation | preuent your  
1341-2 discouery, {and} <of> your secrecie to the King & | Queene moult no fea-
1805 seymour
seymour
1341 your discouery] SEYMOUR (1805): “Your disclosure of what you were enjoined to conceal.”
1843 col1
col1
1341-2 and] Collier (ed. 1843): “The folio erroneously has of for ‘and.’”
1856 hud1 (1851-6)
hud1
1341-2 moult no feather] Hudson (ed. 1856): “That is, not change a feather; moult being an old word for change; applied especially to birds when putting on a new suit of clothes. So in Bacon’s Naturall Historie: ‘Some birds there be, that upon their moulting do turn colour; as robin-redbreasts, after their moulting, grow red again by degrees.’-The whole passages seems to mean, ‘my anticipation shall prevent your discovering to me the purpose of your visit, and so your promise of secrecy be perfectly kept.’ H.”
1857 dyce1
dyce1
1340-2 I will tell...feather]Dyce (ed. 1857): “‘I will tell you why; so shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather.’ So the quartos, &c.--Mr Knight deliberately prints, with the folio, ‘I will tell you why; so shall my anticipation prevent your discovery of your secrecy to the king and queen. Moult no feather.’”
1870 abbott
abbott
1340-57] Abbott (§515): “Prose. Prose is not only used in comic scenes; it is adopted for letters (M. of V. [4.1.149-66. (2059-2066)]), and in other occasions where it is desirable to lower the dramatic pitch: for instance, in the more colloquial parts of the household scene between Volumnia and Virgilia, Coriol. i.3, where the scene begins with prose, then passes into verse, and returns finally to prose. It is also used to express frenzy, Othello, [4.1.34-44. (2409-19)]; and madness, Lear, [4.6.130. (2571)], and the higher flights of the imagination, Hamlet,[2.22.310-20. (1340-1—1356-7)].”
1872 hud2
hud2 = hud1 minus Bacon explication + magenta
1341-2 moult no feather] Hudson (ed. 1872): “Hamlet’s fine sense of honour is well shown in this. He will not tempt them to any breach of confidence; and he means that, by telling them the reason, he will forestall their disclosure of it. – Moult is an old word for change; used especially of birds when casting their feathers. So in Bacon’s Natural History: ‘Some birds there be, that upon their moulting do turn colour; as robin-redbreasts, after their moulting, grow red again by degrees.’”
1872 cln1
cln1
1341 preuent] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “anticipate, and so stop.”
1341 discouery] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “disclosure. It is used in the same sense in Two Gentelmen of Verona, iii. 1. 45.”
1881 hud3
hud3 = hud2 minus ‘Moult’ note
1340-2 I...feather] Hudson (ed. 1881): “Hamlet’s fine sense of honour is well shown in this. He will not tempt them to any breach of confidence; and he means that, by telling them the reason, he will forestall their disclosure of it.”
1882 elze
elze
1342 moult no feather] Elze (ed. 1882): “Compare Webster, The White Devil; or, Vittoria Corombona (Works, ed. Dyce, in I vol., London, 1857, p. 6b): the great barriers moulted not more feathers than he hath shed hairs, by the confession of his doctor.”
1885 macd
macd
1341-2 your secrecie] MacDonald (ed. 1885): “ The Quarto seems here to have the right reading. ‘your promise of secrecy remain intact:’”
1899 ard1
ard1
1341 preuent your discouery] DOWDEN (ed. 1899): “anticipate your disclosure.”
1340 1341 1342