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Line 654 - Commentary Note (CN) More Information

654 I doe not set my life at a {pinnes} <pins> fee,1.4.65
1733 theo1 R2
theo1
654 pinnes fee] Theobald (ed. 1733, 3: 310 n. 29), on R2 3.4.26 (1836), “The allusion of a Row of Pins, ‘tis true, is mean and ridiculous enough in Conscience; but these disproportion’d Wagers may be justified by a Number of parallel Instances,” including Ham. 654.
Theobald uses 654 in Ham. to discuss his restoration of pins in R2 and he mentions parallels in LLL (head and hat), R3 (Dukedom and denier ), and in Ford, a contemporary of Sh’s.
1773 v1773
v1773
654 pinnes fee] Johnson (ed. 1773): “The value of a pin.”
1778 v1778
v1778 = v1773
654 pinnes fee]
1785 v1785
v1785 = v1778
654 pinnes fee]
1790 mal
mal = v1785
654 pinnes fee]
1791- mWesley in v1785
Wesley
654 pinnes fee] Wesley (1791-): “The note is worth about as much as the text. Who could miss the sense of it? The Doctor has gained no great credit and no great point by his labour.”
1791- rann
rann ≈ v1785
654 pinnes fee] Rann (ed. 1791-): “the value of one.”
1793 v1793
v1793 = mal
654 pinnes fee]
1803 v1803
v1803 = v1793
654 pinnes fee]
1807 Pye
Pye See 1098; cald1
654 pinnes fee]
1813 v1813
v1813 = v1803
654 pinnes fee]
1819 cald1
cald1: Pye
654 pinnes fee] Caldecott (ed. 1819): “At the worth of investiture into lands holden of a superior lord, to no greater amount. In his Com. on the Commentary Mr. Pye says, ‘Gold and fee are the old terms for money and land. See the Pepys Collections, or Percy’s Reliques, passim.’ 8vo. 1807, p. 316. In Newton’s Lennie’s Touchst. of Complexions, we have ‘Nor house, nor land, nor gold, nor fee.’ 12mo 1581. p. 2.b. And the same idea we find in [MM 3.1.105 (1323)] ‘Life I’d throw down as frankly as a pin.’ Isab.”
1821 v1821
v1821 = v1813
654 pinnes fee]
1826 sing1
sing1 ≈ v1821 without attribution
654 Singer (ed. 1726): “ ‘I do not estimate my life at the value of a pin.’ ”
1832 cald2
cald2 = cald1 minus (attribution to Pye, Pepys) + in magenta underlined (immaterial changes in magenta not underlined)
654 pinnes fee] Caldecott (ed. 1832): “At the worth of investiture into lands holden of a superior lord, to no greater amount. In his Com. on the Commentary Mr. Pye says, ‘Gold and fee are the old terms for money and land. i.e. ‘the value, utmost worth, or absolute dominion (for such is fee) over that, which is worth next to nothing. ‘Life I’d throw down as frankly as a pin.’ [MM 3.1.105 (1323)] Isab.
“’Twas a familiar instance. ‘I wis, it were not two-pins hurt, if you turnde a begging.’ Nash’s Almond for a Parrot. 4to. Sign. B.4.b. ‘Gold and fee were the old terms for money and land. See the Pepys Collections, or Percy’s Reliques, passim.’ 8vo. 1807, p. 316. So Newton’s Lennie’s Touchstone of Complexions, we have ‘Nor house, nor land, nor gold, nor fee.’ 12mo. 1581. p. 2.b. Nor house, nor land, nor gold, nor fee.’ And the same idea we find in [MM 3.1.105 (1323)] ‘Life I’d throw down as frankly as a pin.’ Isab.” Percy’s Reliques, passim and see ‘fee of grief.’ [Mac. 4.3.196 (2039)]. Macd.
1865 hal
hal = cald2
654 pinnes fee]
1872 cln1
cln1john without attribution + in magenta underlined
654 pinnes fee] Clark & Wright (ed. 1872): “fee, from Anglo-Saxon feoh (vieh in German), meaning first ‘cattle,’ then ‘money,’ like pecus, pecunia in Latin, for ‘the importance of cattle in a simple state of society early caused an intimate connection between the notion of cattle and of money or weath.’ (Wedgwood, Dictionary of English Etymology, s,v,) Cowel, in his Law Dictionary, derives it from ‘fief.’ Whatever its origin it comes to mean ‘property,’ ‘estate.’ ‘A pin’s fee’ is ‘a pin’s worth.’”
1886 Very
Very
654 Very (1886, p. 56): “So far is [Hamlet] from being a coward, in the common meaning of that term, that he does not set this life at a pin’s fee.”
1939 kit2
kit2: standard
654 a pinnes fee] Kittredge (ed. 1939): "the value of a pin."
1950 Tilley
Tilley
654 Tilley (1950, P 334): “Not worth a Pin [. . . ] 1590 Lodge Rosalynde, p. 81: the wedding was not worth a pinne.”
1980 pen2
pen2
654 a pinnes fee] Spencer (ed. 1980): “the value of a trifle.”
1982 ard2
ard2: King James
654-5 my life . . . soule] Jenkins (ed. 1982): “It is one of these that the Ghost, if it were a devil, would be aiming at. Cf. James I, Demonology, 3.2, where the devil is said to trouble men ’to obtain one of two things . . .The one is the tinsel of their life . . . The other . . . is the tinsel of their soul.’ ”
1985 cam4
cam4
654 fee] Edwards (ed. 1985): "payment; hence ’worth’."
1987 oxf4
oxf4
654 set] Hibbard (ed. 1987): "value, regard."

oxf4: Tilley P334 +
654 at . . . fee] Hibbard (ed. 1987): still a proverb now.
1988 bev2
bev2: standard
654 fee] Bevington (ed. 1988): “value.”
1992 fol2
fol2: standard
654 a pinnes fee] Mowat & Werstine (ed. 1992): “the cost of a pin”
2006 ard3q2
ard3q2: standard gloss; Dent
654 Thompson & Taylor (ed. 2006): “’I do not value my life at the worth of a pin’ (proverbial: Dent, P334)”
654